Category Archives: Fiber Patch Cords

Solution for Fiber Patch Cable Bending

When you install fiber optic jumper cables, you should not bend them beyond their bend radius, for light may “leak out” when the fiber is bent. To install fiber optic jumper cables in tight spaces of high-density fiber patching areas in data centers, more cable bending are inevitably needed. As the fiber bends more acutely, more light leaks out (shown in the picture below). How to solve this problem? The answer is bend insensitive fiber patch cable. Bend insensitive fiber patch cable exhibits much lower optical power loss under bend conditions while remaining compatible with conventional cabling. What is bend insensitive fiber patch cable? This post will talk about this solution.

bend-insensitive-fiber-patch-cables-1024x340

What Is Bend Radius?

To understand bend insensitive fiber patch cable, first you need to what bend radius is. Bend radius is the minimum radius one can bend a pipe, tube, sheet, cable or hose without kinking it, damaging it, or shortening its life. The smaller the bend radius is, the greater is the material flexibility. When installing fiber optic jumper cables, you need to be careful enough not to exceed the cable bend radius. Usually, if no specific recommendations are available from the cable manufacturer, the cable bend radius should be 20 times smaller than the cable’s outside diameter when pulling the cable and 10 times the outside diameter when lashed in place. For example, while pulling a 2mm diameter cable, only a 40mm sweep is allowed; when lashed in place, make sure it’s a 20mm sweep. For most of today’s fiber patch cables, the bend radius is 30 mm. As we know, there are single-mode patch cable and multimode patch cord, and accordingly there are single-mode bend insensitive fiber patch cables and multimode bend insensitive fiber patch cables. These two kinds of bend insensitive fiber patch cables will be introduced below.

Bend-Radius

Single-mode Bend Insensitive Fiber Patch Cable

Single-mode bend insensitive fiber patch cables have been commercially available for a few years. ITU recommendation G.657 specifies two classes of single-mode bend insensitive fiber patch cables: G.657 A and G.657 B. Each category (A and B) is then divided into two sub-categories: G.657.A1, G.657.A2 and G.657.B1, G.657.B2. The minimum bend radius of G.657.A1 fibers is 10 mm, G.657.A2 and G.657.B1 fibers is 7.5 mm and G.657.B2 fibers is 5 mm. G.657.A1 and G.657.A2 fibers are fully compliant with ITU-T G.652.D fibers. Compared with minimum bend radius of the standard single-mode G.652 fibers, which is usually 30 mm, G.657 single-mode bend insensitive fiber patch cables are much more flexible, which thus can be confidently installed with a variety of installation methods and in the increasingly high-density application spaces of today’s data center.

Single-mode Bend Insensitive Fiber Patch Cable

Multimode Bend Insensitive Fiber Patch Cable

Multimode bend insensitive fiber patch cables with a minimum bend radius of 7.5mm compares very favorably to the 30mm bend radius traditionally specified. To achieve this, an optical “trench” is added to the cladding area outside of the fiber core. This trench retains most of the light that would have escaped the core of a traditional multimode fiber. Requirements for a tighter bend radius have been developed based primarily on factors in the FTTH (fiber to the home) market. However, the benefits for premise markets have rapidly become apparent, particularly in data centers where more and more fibers are being installed in smaller areas. The expectation is that this new feature can enable deployment of multimode fibers in higher densities.

Multimode Bend Insensitive Fiber Patch Cable

Conclusion

Bend insensitive fiber patch cables are made with solid trench which assists fiber optic cable to reduce optical loss when the cable is bent. They provide the same high quality, mechanical features and optical performance as standard fiber patch cords with the added capability of maintaining optical performance when bent or flexed. Bend insensitive fiber patch cables are available for multimode (OM2, OM3 and OM4) and single-mode (OS2) networks. Whether to choose single-mode bend insensitive fiber patch cables or multimode bend insensitive fiber patch cables, you can make a decision based on your applications.

Fiber Patch Cable Solutions for High Speed Applications

We know that fiber optic jumper cables are designed to interconnect or cross connect fiber networks within structured cabling systems. They are commonly used in data centers to interconnect ports and transceivers that accept LC and MPO/MTP fiber optic connectors. There are a full range of cost-effective fiber optic patch cable solutions to meet your demands now and even for your future upgrades. This post will demonstrate high-speed fiber patch cable solutions for 10G, 40G, and 100G Ethernet transceiver ports interconnection.

10G Transceiver Interconnection Solution

Today’s data centers are still primarily architected around 10 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE). After almost ten years of revolution, SFP+ optical transceiver gradually becomes the main stream of 10G transceiver in data center optics market. According to the optical ports of SFP+ form factor, LC duplex fiber patch cable is required to complete the link between two SFP+ transceiver modules which are plugged into switches, routers or server NICs (Network Interface Cards), as shown in the following picture. High quality standard LC duplex patch cables are available in both single-mode and multimode versions, which are LC LC single-mode duplex fiber cable and LC LC multimode duplex fiber cable. With a wide range of material options, they can meet any working environment.

10G Transceiver Interconnected Solution

40G Transceiver Interconnection Solution

In recent several years, 40 GbE has gained more popularity and the market of 40GbE is encouraging. As data centers tend to deploy 40G Ethernet, 40G transceivers are ramping up. QSFP+ (quad small form-factor pluggable plus), as the most popular form factor for 40 GbE, has been widely used in data center switching fabrics. For the short reach interconnection between two QSFP+ optical transceiver ports, each QSFP+ module requires an MPO/MTP connection, as shown in the following picture. MTP to MTP (or MPO to MPO) assemblies can also be in single-mode or multimode versions, with jacket ratings of riser, plenum or LSZH. Users can easily upgrade their networks to future 40/100G applications with popular multimode OM3 and OM4 cable assemblies. Note: For single-mode 40G QSFP+ interconnection, duplex LC single-mode patch cable is commonly used; but for 40GBASE-PLRL4 QSFP+ interconnection, a 12-fiber MPO/MTP single-mode cable is needed.

40G Transceiver Interconnected Solution 1

Other than the QSFP+ to QSFP+ connection, a single QSFP+ port (4 x 10 Gbps) can also breakout to four SFP+ ports, which is another interconnected solution for 40G transceiver. Using an MPO/MTP to LC assemblies, as shown in the following picture, can easily achieve the migration of 10G to 40G.

40G Transceiver Interconnected Solution 2

100G Transceiver Interconnection Solution

As the increasing bandwidth requirements of private and public cloud data centers and communication service providers, 100GbE has been growing rapidly and 2016 is considered as the year of 100G. Various 100G transceivers, such as CXP, CFP, CFP2, CFP4 and QSFP28 are available for different applications requiring data rates of 100G.

CXP/CFP to CXP/CFP Interconnection

24-fiber MPO/MTP assemblies, implemented with 10 lanes of 10 Gbps, are ideal for 100GBASE-SR10 CXP/CFP to CXP/CFP interconnection in data center. Among the 24 fibers, only 20 fibers in the middle of the connector are used to transmit and receive signals at 10 Gbps and the 2 top and bottom fibers are unused. The picture below shows the interconnection between two 100GBASE-SR10 CXP ports.

100G Transceiver Interconnected Solution 1

QSFP28 to QSFP28 Interconnection

QSFP28 optical transceiver has the exact same footprint as the 40G QSFP+ module, but QSFP28 is implemented with four 25Gbps lanes. To interconnect a multimode QSFP28 link, a 12-fiber MPO/MTP patch cable is required, but for a single-mode link (100GBASE-LR4 QSFP28), a duplex LC single-mode patch cable is required. The interconnection of QSFP28 multimode link is similar with the case of 40GBASE-SR4 QSFP+.

CXP/CFP to 10 SFP+ Interconnection

As mentioned above, 100GBASE-SR10 CXP/CFP module uses ten 10Gbps lanes to achieve 100Gbps data rate. Thus, a CXP/CFP port can be breakout to ten SFP+ ports using a 24-fiber MTP to LC harness cables, as shown in the following picture.

100G Transceiver Interconnected Solution 2

Conclusion

From 10G to 40G to 100G data center networks, bandwidth requirements have been increasing rapidly. Equipment needed to achieve those bandwidths have also improved a lot. Various high-speed fiber patch cable solutions are required for 10G, 40G, and 100G Ethernet transceiver ports interconnection. You just need to make the appropriate choices based on your requirements.

Selecting Right Fiber Optic Patch Cables

There are various fiber optic patch cables for different applications. Fiber optic jumper cables are available in OS1, OS2 single-mode types and OM1, OM2, OM3, OM4 multimode types. Fiber optic jumper cables are terminated on both ends with a high performance hybrid or single type fiber optic connector, such as SC, ST, FC, LC, MTRJ, or E2000 connector in simplex or duplex. How to choose right fiber optic patch cables for your networks? Here are 6 factors that you need to take into consideration.

Connector Type

A fiber optic patch cable is terminated on both ends with a fiber optic connector, such as LC connector, SC connector, ST connector, FC connector, or MPO/MTP connector. Different connectors are used to plug into different devices. If ports of devices in the both ends are the same, we can use fiber optic patch cables with the same type of connectors on both ends, such as LC LC cables, SC SC fiber patch cord, ST ST fiber patch cable, or MPO-MPO patch cables. If you want to connect different ports type devices, fiber optic patch cables with different types of connectors on both ends, like LC SC fiber patch cable, LC to ST fiber patch cable, or SC to ST fiber cable, may suit you.

LC-SC-ST-FC-MPO-MTP-fiber-optic-patcah-cable

Connector Polish Type

Other than choosing the right connector type, you also need to choose the right connector polish type, whether the same polish type of the same connector type or different polish types of different connector types on both ends, such as SC APC fiber patch cord, SC/APC to LC patch cable. The loss of APC connectors is lower than UPC connectors. Usually, the optical performance of APC connectors is better than UPC connectors. APC connectors are widely used in applications such as FTTx, passive optical network (PON) and wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) that are more sensitive to return loss. But APC connector is usually more expensive than UPC connector. With those applications that call for high precision optical fiber signaling, APC should be the first consideration, but less sensitive digital systems will perform equally well using UPC.

Single-mode or Multimode?

Fiber optic patch cable has two propagation modes: multi-mode and single-mode. Single-mode fiber patch cord uses 9/125um glass fiber. It is designed for the transmission of a single ray or mode of light as a carrier and is used for long-distance signal transmission. Multimode fiber patch cord usually uses 50/125um or 62.5/125um glass fiber. It can carry multiple light rays or modes, each at a slightly different reflection angle within the optical fiber core. Multimode fiber optic patch cables is used for relatively short distances because the modes tend to disperse over longer lengths. Typical single-mode fiber optic patch cable used yellow fiber cable and multi mode fiber optic patch cable used orange or aqua fiber cable.

single-mode-multimode-fiber-optic-patch-cable

Simplex or Duplex?

Do you need simplex or duplex fiber optic patch cords? There is only one single strand of glass or plastic fiber in a simplex fiber optic patch cord. It is often used where only a single transmit and/or receive line is required between devices. A simplex fiber optic patch cord has only one fiber optic connector at each end, often used for Bidirectional (BiDi) fiber optic transceivers. A duplex fiber patch cord consists of two strands of glass or plastic fiber which are typically found in a tight-buffered and jacketed “zipcord” construction format. The duplex fiber is most often used for duplex communication between devices where a simultaneous and separate transmit and receive are required. Duplex fiber patch cords are used for common transceivers. Simplex and duplex fiber patch cords both are available in single mode and multi-mode.

simplex-duplex-fiber-optic-patch-cable

Cable Jacket

Usually, there are three types of cable jacket: Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), Low Smoke Zero Halogen (LSZH) and Optical Fiber Nonconductive Plenum (OFNP). You can see there features in figure below and choose the right one for your network.

PVC-LSZH-OFNP-Fiber-Optic-Patch-Cable

Besides those three cable jacket types above, there is another common cable, armored cable. The double tubing and steel sleeve construction make these patch cables completely light tight, even when they are bent. These cables can withstand high crushing pressures, which makes them suitable for running along floors and other areas where they may be stepped on. The tubing also provides excellent cutting resistance, abrasion resistance, and high tensile strength.

Armored-Fiber-Optic-Patch-Cable

Cable Length

Fiber optic jumper cables are made in different lengths, usually from 0.5m to 50m. You can choose an appropriate cable length according to the distance between the devices you want to connect.

Conclusion

When choosing a right fiber optic patch cord, you need to consider all these six factors carefully. Single-mode or multimode, simplex or duplex, APC or UPC connector polish type, which one is right for your networks? Which kind of fiber optic connector do you need, SC, ST, FC, LC, MTRJ, or E2000 connector? By figuring out what you need exactly and consider all these six factors, you can make appropriate choices for your applications.

The Basics of OM4 Multimode Fibers

As the demand for bandwidth in enterprise applications such as data centers continues to boom, new transmission media must be developed continually to meet end user requirements. With next-generation 40 and 100 Gigabit Ethernet speeds on the horizon, the industry is developing a new type of multimode fiber called OM4. What is it? Why is it able to meet the high data rate requirements? Here is what you need to know about OM4 multimode fibers.

What Is OM4 Fiber?

Two standards define the use of OM4 fiber in high-speed networks: TIA document TIA-492AAAD, which contains the OM4 fiber performance specifications; and the IEC 60793-2-10 international standard, which provides equivalent OM4 specifications under fiber type A1a.3. OM4 multi-mode fiber has a core of 50 microns, but the fiber is optimized for laser based equipment that uses fewer modes of light. It is designed to enhance the system cost benefits enabled by 850 nm VCSELs (vertical cavity surface emitting lasers) for existing 1Gbps and 10Gbps applications as well as future 40Gbps and 100Gbps systems. OM4 fiber will support Ethernet, Fibre Channel, and OIF applications, allowing extended reach upwards of 550 meters at 10Gbps for ultra long building backbones and medium length campus backbones. With an Effective Modal Bandwidth (EMB, also known as laser bandwidth) of 4700 MHz-km(more than double the IEEE requirement for 10Gbps 300 meter support), OM4 fiber is also especially well suited for shorter reach data center and high performance computing applications. It is important to note that OM4 glass is not necessarily designed to be a replacement for OM3. Despite the relatively long-standing availability of OM4, there are no plans to obsolete OM3 fiber optic cabling.

12-fiber-50125-10g-om4-multimode-ribbon-fan-out-lcupc-pigtail

Advantages of OM4 Fiber

OM4 provides an opportunity to future-proof cabling infrastructure. OM4 is completely backwards-compatible with existing OM3 systems. As a result, these two grades of glass are interchangeable within the transmission distance limitations. The additional bandwidth and lower attenuation of OM4 provide additional insertion loss margin. As a result, users of OM4 gain additional safety margin to help compensate for less-than-ideal cabling installations as well as provide margin for degradation due to moves, adds, and changes over the life of the installation.

OM4 Fiber Patch Cable

OM4 is the latest high modal bandwidth high performance 50/125 Graded Index Multimode (GIMM) cabled fibre specification. OM4 fiber enables extended range performance over high bit rate links such as 8 Gigabit Fiber Channel and 10 Gigabit Ethernet compared to existing fibre types. OM4 fiber patch cable can be regarded as improvement on the existed OM3 standards. Its assemblies are ready to meet the requirement for future 40G and 100G fiber optic networks, there are simplex and duplex OM4 multimode fiber patch cord types. OM4 multimode fiber patch cable are terminated with different fiber optic connectors, like LC, SC, ST, FC, MTRJ, MU, and E2000. These cables can be simplex or duplex and customized in optional lengths.

Conclusion

The demand for the development of network transmission requires that optical fiber can support future 40Gbit/s and 100Gbit/s transmission. OM4 fiber provides next generation multimode fiber performance for today and tomorrow’s high speed applications. With its significantly higher bandwidth, network designers and operators can be assured that fiber patch cord will continue to provide the most cost effective solutions for short reach applications in data centers and LANs. Laser-optimized multi-mode fiber OM4 takes advantage of 850 nm VCSEL laser technology to reduce the overall cost, provide you with higher bandwidth choices.

How Do OS1 and OS2 Differ from Each Other?

These are two standards for single mode fibre optic cabling that are generally used today, OS1 and OS2. OS1 and OS2 are cabled single mode optical fibre specifications. The difference between OS1 and OS2 fiber optic cables mainly lie in the performance due to cable construction. How are OS1 and OS2 single mode fiber cables constructed? Choosing the right fiber jumper is very critical to improve the functionality of your network. Here is some information related to the differences between the OS1 and OS2 single mode fiber cables.

OS1-and-OS2-Fiber-Optic-Cable

Cable Construction and the Differences

OS1 single mode fibers are compliant with ITU-T G.652A/B, and the low-water-peak fibers defined by ITU-T G.652C and G.652D also come under OS1 single mode fibers, that is to say OS1 is compliant with specifications of ITU-T G.652. OS1 cabling is tight-buffered construction, embedded in a heavy polymer jacket. The jacketed fiber is generally enclosed, with a bundle of flexible fibrous polymer strength members like aramid in a lightweight plastic cover to form a simple cable.

OS2 single mode fibers are only compliant with ITU-T G.652C/D standards, which means that OS2 fibers are very clearly the low-water-peak fibers only. OS1 was first introduced in the year 2002 and OS2 in the year 2006. OS2 cabling is loose-tube design. Cable with this construction is appropriate for outdoor cases. For use in more strenuous environments, a much more robust cable construction is required. In loose-tube construction, the fiber is laid helically into semi-rigid tubes, allowing the cable to stretch without stretching the fiber itself. This protects the fiber from tension during laying and due to temperature changes.

Applications

For their different cable constructions, OS1 and OS2 fiber cables have different application areas. OS1 is for indoor use, such as campusand data centre. Cabling is is tight buffered (manufactured into solid medium). Indoor fiber is more tolerant of bending. The fiber is more plastic and able to bend plus the buffered cable reduces the risk of catastrophic damage. OS2 is for outdoor or loose tube use, like street, underground/burial, etc. Outdoor fibers are bend sensitive and thus more likely to break during install unless care is taken.

Besides, they also have different degrees of attenuation. OS1 indoor fiber has greater loss per kilometer than OS2. In general, the maximum attenuation for OS1 is 1.0 db/km and 0.4db/km for OS2. As a result, the maximum transmission distance of OS1 single mode fiber is 2 km but the maximum transmission distance of OS2 single mode fiber can reach 5 km and up to 10 km. Though the maximum transmission distance of OS2 single mode fiber is much longer than that of OS1, OS1 is much cheaper than OS2 for the cheaper materials.

Conclusion

But both OS1 and OS2 cable types allow a distance of one to 10 gigabit Ethernet. And another point which needs to be paid attention to is that OS2 single mode optical fiber cables can not be connected with OS1 single mode optical fiber cables because it may lead to unpredictable signal performance. Fiberstore supplies both OS1 and OS2 single mode patch cables, and all other kinds of fiber patch cords with differernt connector options, such as SC single mode patch cable, LC multi-mode patch cable, MPO cable, etc. We provide fiber-based patch cables with high quality.

Several Common Types of Fiber Optic Patch Cords

Fiber optic patch cable is a simple fiber optic elements, consisting of a short length of optical fiber cable with a connector at each end. According to the optical connectors terminated on both ends, fiber jumpers can be divided into many different types. FC, SC, ST, LC, and MT-RJ are several commonly used connector types. Fiber patch cords with these five kinds of connectors will be briefly introduced below.

FCFC Fiber Optic Patch Cord

FC connector is the choice for singlemode fibers and mainly used in SM fiber optic components and in high speed fiber optic communication links. This high precision, ceramic ferrule connector is equipped with an anti rotation key, reducing fiber endface damage and rotational alignment sensitivity of the fiber. The key is also used for repeatable alignment of fibers in the optimal, minimal loss position. FC fiber optic patch cord come with a zirconia ceramic ferrule with pre-polished PC profile and convex spherical end, and both singlemode and multimode versions of FC fiber optic patch cable are available.

STST Fiber Optic Patch Cord

ST connector is used extensively in field and indoor fiber optic LAN applications. Its high precision, ceramic ferrule allows its use with both multimode and singlemode fibers. ST fiber cable connector has a bayonet-style housing and a long spring-loaded ferrule hold the fiber, preventing over tightening and damaging of the fiber end. Horizontally mounted simplex and duplex adapters are available with metal or plastic housing, with a choice of phosphor bronze or zirconia split sleeve. ST fiber patch cord is one of the older generations of connector, but is still widely used for multimode networks, including LANs for buildings and campuses.

LCLC Fiber Optic Patch Cord

LC connector utilizes the traditional components of a SC duplex connector, having independent ceramic ferrules and housings with the overall size scaled down by one half. The LC family of connectors indcludes a stand-alone simplex design, a “behind the wall” (BTW) connector available in both simplex and duplex configurations. LC fiber optic patch cord is a push and latch structure. It is widely used for densely installation with high performance and is highly favored for singlemode applications.

SCSC Fiber Optic Patch Cord

SC connector is becoming increasingly popular in singlemode fiber optic telecom and analog CATV, field deployed links. The high precision, ceramic ferrule construction is optimal for aligning singlemode optical fibers. The connector’s outer square profile combined with its push-pull coupling mechanism, allows for greater connector packaging density in instruments and patch panels. The keyed outer body prevents rotational sensitivity and fiber endface damage. Multimode versions of SC connector are also available. SC fiber patch cord is one of the most commonly used fiber optic cable in fiber optic networks, convenient to use and cost-saving.

MTRJMT-RJ Fiber Optic Patch Cord

MT-RJ connector uses a form factor and latch similar to the 8P8C (RJ45) connectors. Two separate fibers are included in one unified connector. It is easier to terminate and install than ST or SC connectors. The smaller size allows twice the port density on a face plate than ST or SC connectors. There are two variations: pinned and no-pin. The pinned variety, which has two small stainless steel guide pins on the face of the connector, is used in patch panels to mate with the no-pin connectors on MT-RJ patch cords. MT-RJ fiber connectors utilize precision molded MT ferrules pioneered by NTT, together with precision metal guide pins and precise housing dimensions to ensure fiber alignment when mating. MT-RJ fiber patch cable is reliable and simple to terminate.

fiber-patch-cords

Conclusion

Fiber optic patch cables are used to connect various componets and instruments in a fiber optic system. Connectors on both ends can determine the overall performance of the system to some degree. Other than choosing singlemode or multimode, simplex or duplex fiber optic patch cables, you also need to make the right choice of which cnnector type you need.

Multimode Fiber Optic Patch Cable Overview

We know that fiber optic patch cables play a very important role in the connection between devices and equipment. When talking about fiber optic patch cables, we usually divide them into multimode fiber optic patch cables and singlemode fiber optic patch cables according to the modes of the cable. What is multimode fiber optic patch cable? How many types of multimode patch cables are there? And what is the difference between multimode and singlemode patch cables? What are the applications of multimode patch cables? This text will solve those questions one by one.

Introduction

Multi-mode fiber patch cables are described by the diameters of their core and cladding. There are two different core sizes of multi-mode fiber patch cords: 50 microns and 62.5 microns. Both 62.5 microns and 50 microns patch cable feature the same glass cladding diameter of 125 microns. Thus, a 62.5/125µm multi-mode fiber patch cable has a 62.5µm core and a 125µm diameter cladding; and a 50/125µm multi-mode fiber patch cable has a 50µm core and a 125µm diameter cladding. The larger core of multi-mode fiber patch cords gathers more light and allows more signals to be transmitted, as shown below. Transmission of many modes of light down a multi-mode fiber patch cable simultaneously causes signals to weaken over time and therefore travel short distance.

singlemode fiber vs multimode fiber

Types of Multimode Fiber Optic Patch Cable

Multimode fiber optic cables can be divided into OM1, OM2, OM3, and OM4 based on the types of multimode fiber. The letters “OM” stands for optical multimode. OM1 and OM2 belong to traditional multimode fiber patch cable, while OM3 and OM4 belong to the new generation fiber patch cable which provides sufficient bandwidth to support 10 Gigabit Ethernet up to 300 meters. The connector types include LC, FC, SC, ST, MU, E2000, MPO and so on. Different type of connector is available to different equipment and fiber optic cable.

By the materials of optic fiber cable jackets, multimode fiber patch cord can be divided into four different types, PVC, LSZH, plenum, and armored multimode patch cable. PVC is non-flame retardant, while the LSZH is flame retardant and low smoke zero halogen. Plenum is compartment or chamber to which one or more air ducts are connected and forms part of the air distribution system. Because plenum cables are routed through air circulation spaces, which contain very few fire barriers, they need to be coated in flame-retardant, low smoke materials. Armored fiber patch cable use rugged shell with aluminum armor and kevlar inside the jacket, and it is 10 times stronger than regular fiber patch cable.

Difference Between Singlemode and Multimode Patch Cables

Multimode and singlemode fiber optic patch cables are different mainly because they have different sizes of cores, which carry light to transmit data. Singlemode fiber optic patch cables have a core of 8 to 10 microns. Multimode fiber patch cable allows multiple beams of light passing through, while singlemode fiber cable allows a single beam of light passing through. As modal dispersion happens in multimode fiber cable, the transmission distance is relevantly nearer than singlemode fiber cables. Therefore, multimode fiber optic patch cable is generally used in relevantly recent regions network connections, while the singlemode fiber cable is often used in broader regions.

Applications of Multimode Fiber Optic Patch Cable

Multi-mode fiber patch cables are used to connect high speed and legacy networks like Gigabit Ethernet, Fast Ethernet and Ethernet. OM1 and OM2 cables are commonly used in premises applications supporting Ethernet rates of 10Mbps to 1Gbps, which are not suitable though for today’s higher-speed networks. OM3 and OM4 are best multimode options of today. For prevailing 10Gbps transmission speeds, OM3 is generally suitable for distance up to 300 meters, and OM4 is suitable for distance up to 550 meters.

Conclusion

Fiber optic patch cords are designed to interconnect or cross connect fiber networks within structured cabling systems. Typical fiber connector interfaces are SC, ST, and LC in either multimode or singlemode applications. Whether to choose a singlemode or multimode fiber patch cable, it all depends on applications that you need, transmission distance to be covered as well as the overall budget allowed.

Introduction to OM4 Fiber Patch Cords

Nowadays, with the rapid development of multimedia, there is requirement for growing broader bandwidth for audio and video applications. Multi-mode fiber optic patch cords are used to connect high speed and legacy networks like 10/40/100 Gigabit Ethernet, fast Ethernet and Ethernet. OM4 fiber optic patch cord is one of those commonly used fiber optic patch cables designed to meet this increasing requirement. It is terminated with standard connectors which give optimum optical performance.

Definition of OM4 Fiber Patch Cords

OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cord is a 50µm laser-optimized multi-mode fiber patch cable with extended bandwidth. It is used in networks where an overwhelming or extreme amount of data needs to be transferred. OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cords can also enhance the system cost benefits enabled by 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for existing 1 and 10 Gb/s applications as well as 40 and 100 Gb/s systems. They are typically used in 10 Gigabit Ethernet. They can be regarded as improvement on the existed OM3 standards.

Types of OM4 Fiber Patch Cords

OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cords can be categorized into different types based on various standards. There are many different kinds of connectors, like FC, LC, SC and ST. Connector types on both ends of the OM4 fiber patch cable can be the same and can also be different. For example, an OM4 fiber patch cable with an LC connector on each end is known as LC to LC patch cable, and an OM4 fiber patch cable with an LC connector on one end and an SC connector on the other end is known as LC to SC patch cable. OM4 multi-mode patch cords can also be divided into simplex and duplex. A simplex OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cord has only one single strand of glass or plastic fiber in it. It is often used where only a single transmit or receive line is required between devices. A duplex OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cord consists of two strands of glass or plastic fiber which are typically found in a tight-buffered and jacketed “zipcord” construction format. It is most often used for duplex communication between devices where a simultaneous and separate transmit and receive are required. The following picture is a duplex OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cord.

Duplex-OM4-Multimode-Fiber-Patch-Cable-300x2141

Applications of OM4 Fiber Patch Cords

OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cords can connect high speed and legacy networks including Gigabit Ethernet, Fast Ethernet and Ethernet. They also support Fiber Channel and OIF applications, allowing extended reach upwards of 550m at 10 Gb/s for ultra long building backbones and medium length campus backbones. Besides, OM4 fiber patch cords support video, data and voice services in data centers and premises cabling in data networks including backbone, riser and horizontal. With an effective modal bandwidth (EMB) of 4700 MHz/km, OM4 fiber patch cords are also especially well suitable for shorter reach data center and high performance computing applications. OM4 fiber patch cables effectively provide a minimum reach of 125m over multi-mode fiber within the 40 and 100 gigabit Ethernet standards.

Fiberstore provides the broadest choice of fiber optic patch cords to the industry including OM3 fiber patch cable, OM4 fiber patch cable, MPO cable and other special fiber patch cords with multiple connector choices. Our OM4 fiber patch cable has armored and non-armored options. We make reliable and top quality OM4 fiber patch cords at an affordable price.

The Basics of Push-Pull Patch Cables

During cabling and daily maintenance, it is inevitable to plug fiber optic connectors in or pull them out from switches. But finger access to each patch cable and connector is very difficult in a high density cabling system. For patch cords with connectors like LC that are locked in the interface, it would be even more difficult, for you have to unlock the connector from the port first before pull it out. To solve this problem, a simple and easy solution for high density cable management is introduced, which is push-pull patch cable. This article will give you a brief introduction to it.

What Is Push-Pull Patch Cable?

A push-pull patch cable, or push-pull patch cord, has the same components and internal-structure as the traditional patch cords, except a tab attached to the connector used for pushing or pulling the whole connector, so it is also called push-pull tab patch cord. This small push-pull tab looks simple but it is functional for high density cabling in 40/100G migration. High density cabling for 40G/100G and beyond usually employs MPO and LC connectors. The image below shows push-pull patch cables with LC or MPO connectors.

push-pull-tab-patch-cords_

Two Types of Push-Pull Patch Cable

As mentioned above, MPO and LC connectors are two commonly used connector types for push-pull patch cables. At this part, push-pull tab LC patch cord and push-pull tab MPO patch cable will be introduced.

Push-Pull LC Patch Cord: Push-pull LC patch cord contains the custom push-pull strain relief boot, and allows users easy accessibility when deploying very high density LC patch fields in data center applications. Push-pull tab LC cables are available in riser (OFNR), and low smoke zero halogen (LSZH) rated jacket materials to comply with local cabling ordinances and OM4, OM3 or OS1/OS2 fiber types to meet the demands of today’s highest speed applications. They provide interconnect and cross-connect of applications in entrance facilities, telecommunication rooms, data centers, at the desk and network applications to interconnect pre-terminated cassettes in main distribution, horizontal distribution, and equipment distribution areas.

Push-Pull MPO Patch Cable: Push-pull tab MPO patch cable allows high-density connections between network equipment in telecommunication rooms. They feature push-pull tab connectors that offer maximum accessibility in high density installations. You can install or remove it with one hand, providing quick fiber optic connections. The MTP/MPO connector is approximately the same size of a SC connector and it can accommodate 24 fibers, so it provides up to 24 times the density of SC style connectors, thereby offering savings in circuit card and rack space. High-density design cuts down on installation costs. And there is no need for long fan-out cables or individual long duplex cable runs.

Applications and Advantages

Push-pull patch cables offer ease of installation as well as superior performance. Other advantages include easy to remove, reducing risk of failure, and space saving. They utilize the latest engineered polymers, precision ceramics, and the finest metals to address specific applications, enabling a wide range of cable choices, SMF or MMF. They are highly recommended in interconnect systems. The table below shows their applications in details.

Push-pull patch cable applications

Push-pull tab patch cords can support high durability and flexibility which fit the connection between devices of different data rate. Fiberstore offers a full range of push-pull patch cables for your network applications. You can always buy from us with confidence.

Introduction to Mode Conditioning Patch Cable

Mode conditioning patch cord (MCP) was developed as a solution for network applications where Gigabit Ethernet hubs with laser based transmitters are deployed. It is a special fiber optic patch cord and allows customer upgrading their hardware technology without the cost of upgrading fiber plant. In addition, MCP significantly improves data signal quality while increasing the transmission distance. The text gives some detailed information about mode conditioning patch cable.

What Is Mode Conditioning Patch Cable?

A mode conditioning patch cord is a duplex multi-mode patch cord that has a small length of single mode fiber at the start of the transmission leg, and also a single mode to multi-mode offset fiber connection part in this leg. There are two multi-mode fibers on one end and one multi-mode and one single mode fiber on the other end. It is fully compliant with IEEE 802.3z application standards. Mode conditioning patch cord causes the single mode transceiver to create a launch similar to a typical multi-mode launch. It is designed for long wavelength Gigabit Ethernet applications. The following picture shows the construction of a mode conditioning patch cable.

mode-conditioning-patch-cord2

How Does Mode Conditioning Patch Cable Work?

The basic principle behind the cord is that you launch your laser into the small section of single mode fiber. The launch of the light coming out of the equipment begins on a single mode fiber. The other end of the single mode fiber is coupled to multi-mode section of the cable with the core offset from the center of the multi-mode fiber. The light is launched on to the multi-mode fiber at a precise angle, giving the cable its mode conditioning properties. When we use such mode conditioning fiber optic patch cords, we need to connect the yellow leg which is the color of single mode to connect the transmit side of the equipment (single mode Gigabit transceiver) while we connect the orange leg which is the color of multi-mode to the receive side. The picture below shows how the single mode fiber is coupled to multi-mode section of the cable.

Mode-Conditioning-Fiber-Patch-Cable-1024x403

Why Do We Need Mode Conditioning Patch Cable?

Transceiver modules used in Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Base-LX) launch only single mode (1300nm) long wave signals, which poses a problem if an existing fiber network utilizes multi-mode cable. When a single mode signal is launched into a multi-mode fiber a phenomenon known as differential mode delay (DMD) can create multiple signals within the multi-mode fiber. This effect can confuse the receiver and produce errors. By allowing the single mode laser launch to be offset away from the center of the multi-mode fiber, mode conditioning patch cord reduces the effect of such differential mode delay and provides a much higher operational bandwidth by precisely aligning a single mode termination at the laser transmitter. This is essential for networks using 62.5/125 and 50/125 multi-mode optical fiber and may be specified for current multi-mode networks depending upon the system requirements.

Mode conditioning patch cables are with various options, from all types of connectors to different jackets and different lengths. A variety of fiber optic connectors are available for your convenience, including: LC/UPC, SC/UPC, FC/UPC, ST/UPC, LC/APC, SC/APC, FC/APC, and MTRJ. Fiberstore is a professional manufacturer and supplier, offering all kinds of fiber optic cables, including LC to LC fiber cable, SC fiber patch cable, MPO fiber cable, PM fiber patch cords, etc. You can get what you need from us.

What Are Simplex and Duplex Fiber Optic Patch Cords?

Fiber optic patch cord, also known as fiber optic patch cable or fiber jumper, is a fiber optic cable terminated with fiber optic connectors on its both ends. According to fiber cable structures, fiber optic patch cords can be divided into simplex and duplex fiber jumpers. What are simplex and duplex fiber optic patch cords? And what are their differences? This post will give answers to these two questions.

Simplex Fiber Optic Patch Cord

Simplex fiber patch cord has one fiber and one connector on each end. Both single mode and multi-mode simplex optic patch cords have only one single strand of fiber. The core of a single mode simplex optic patch cord is 8 to 10 microns. Light travels toward the center of the core in a single wavelength in single mode patch cables. The core of a multi-mode simplex optic patch cord is either 50 or 62.5 microns. The core of the latter gathers more light compared to the former, and allows more signals to be transmitted.

Duplex Fiber Optic Patch Cord

Duplex fiber optic patch cable has two fibers and two connectors on each end. There are single mode and multi-mode duplex optic patch cords. A single mode duplex optic patch cord is constructed of two identical strands of single mode fiber. A multi-mode duplex optic patch cord is constructed of two identical strands of multi-mode fiber. For example, a duplex 9/125 single mode fiber patch cable has two strands of 9/125 micron single mode fiber, featuring a 9µm core and 125µm cladding; a duplex 62.5/125 multi-mode fiber patch cable has two strands of 62.5/125 micron multi-mode fiber, featuring a 62.5µm core and 125µm cladding. One fiber transmits data in one direction and the other one transmits data in the reverse direction. Each fiber is marked “A” or “B” or different colored connector boots are used to mark polarity. Every connector can only be connected to the corresponding port, same as the simplex situation. The following picture shows simplex and duplex fiber optic patch cords.

Simplex & Duplex Fiber Patch Cable

What Are Their Differences?

Simplex and duplex fiber patch cords have their respective features and applications. There is only one single strand of glass or plastic fiber in a simplex fiber patch cord. Simplex optic patch cords can be used for applications that only require one-way data transfer. It is just like that water only flows in one direction—downwards. So one end of a simplex fiber patch cord is a fixed transmission end, and the other is a fixed receiving end. A duplex fiber patch cord consists of two strands of glass or plastic fiber which are typically found in a tight-buffered and jacketed “zipcord” construction format. The duplex fiber is most often used for duplex communication between devices where a simultaneous and bi-directional transmit and receive are required, such as backbone ports, workstations, Ethernet switches, fiber switches and servers.

Other than simplex and duplex, with different connectors or cable constructions, there can also be different categories of fiber optic patch cords, like LC-LC fiber patch cord, or ST-LC fiber patch cable. These fiber patch cables can be with custom length. If you want to choose a fiber optic patch cord, you need to take all these things into consideration, simplex or duplex, single mode or multi-mode, connectors, etc.

Fiber Patch Cords vs Fiber Pigtails

Fiber optic patch cord and fiber optic pigtail are two commonly used components in fiber optic networks. They have many things in common and they also differ in distinct ways. Knowing both the similarities and the differences between them will help you make the best selection for your project. The passage mainly talks about their similarities and differences in both structures and applications.

What Are They?

Fiber patch cord, also known as fiber optic patch cable or fiber jumpers, is a short length of optical fiber cable with a connector on each end. Connector types on each side of the fiber patch cable can be different and they can also be the same. For example, an LC-LC fiber patch cord has one LC connector on each end, and an ST-LC fiber patch cable has an ST connector on one end and an LC connector on the other end. Fiber optic pigtail is a piece of cable terminated with a fiber optic connector at only one end of the cable and leaves a length of exposed fiber at the other end, so that the connector side can link to the equipment and the other side can be melted with optical cable fibers or stripped and fusion spliced to a single fiber of a multi-fiber trunk. The following picture shows fiber optic patch cords and fiber optic pigtails.

Optical Fiber Patch Cables & Optical Fiber Pigtails

What Are the Similarities?

Fiber optic patch cord and pigtail structurally have much in common. They are both available in single mode and multi-mode, and they can be made into simplex and duplex. Besides, both fiber patch cord and pigtail can terminate with many kinds of fiber optic connectors, including FC, SC, ST, LC, MTRJ, MPO, MU, SMA, FDDI, E2000, DIN4, and D4.

Functionally, both fiber optic patch cords and pigtails can provide interconnect and cross-connect of applications over installations in entrance facilities, data centers, and telecommunications rooms. They are available in OM4, OM3, OM2, OM1, or OS1/OS2 fiber types to meet the demands of Gigabit Ethernet, 10 Gigabit Ethernet and high speed Fibre Channel.

What Are the Differences?

The major physical difference between fiber optic patch cable and pigtail is that fiber patch cord is a fixed length piece of cable with fiber connectors on each end while fiber pigtail has fiber connectors on only one end of the cable. Fiber optic patch cords can be cut into shorter lengths to make two pigtails. However, they have their respective application areas, too.

Fiber optic patch cords are commonly used to connect ports on fiber distribution frames. They support network applications in main, horizontal and equipment distribution areas and are available in optical fiber riser cable (OFNR), and low smoke zero halogen (LSZH) rated jacket materials to comply with local cabling ordinances. They also support high speed (10/40 Gbs) telecommunications. Fiber optic patch cords can be used in many areas, such as integrated optics, laser detection and display, and materials processing.

Fiber optic pigtails support fusion splice field termination applications. They should be installed where they will be protected and spliced, so they are usually used with fiber optic management equipment like optical distribution frame (ODF), splice closures and cross cabinets. Pigtails are found anywhere, but most commonly in optical assemblages or optical components. There are waterproof fiber optic pigtails used for outdoor applications, which is with thick poly ethylene (PE) jacket and big diameter.

Fiberstore produces high quality fiber optic patch cords and pigtails using a variety of commercially available connectors and fibers. We provide various single mode and multi-mode fiber patch cords and fiber pigtails. These patch cords and pigtails offer low insertion losses, and excellent repeatability. And they can be manufactured to custom length.

Introduction to Multi-mode Fiber Patch Cords

Optical devices of different types are connected with fiber patch cords. Fiber optic patch cord is an optical cable, capped at either end with connectors and used to connect one optical device to another for signal routing. The core of all fiber patch cables carries light to transmit data. By different sizes of cores, fiber optic patch cables can be classified into single mode and multi-mode fiber patch cords. This paper will give a brief introduction to multi-mode fiber patch cords.

What Is Multi-mode Fiber Patch Cord?

Multi-mode fiber optic patch cable has a core of either 50 or 62.5 microns. The larger core of multi-mode fiber patch cords gathers more light compared to single mode, and allows more signals to be transmitted. Transmission of many modes of light down a multi-mode fiber patch cable simultaneously causes signals to weaken over time and therefore travel a short distance. Connector types on both ends of a multi-mode fiber patch cord can be the same and also can be different. Some of the most common multi-mode connectors include LC, FC, SC, ST, etc. With different connector types, multi-mode fiber patch cables can be connected with various telecommunication equipment.

LC Multimode Patch Cords

Common Multi-mode Fiber Patch Cords

There are four common types of multi-mode fiber patch cords, OM1, OM2, OM3, and OM4. Letters “OM” stand for optical multi-mode. These 4 types of multi-mode fiber patch cords are different from each other in various aspects, and their differences determine their respective characteristics and application areas.

OM1 multi-mode fiber patch cord has a bigger core diameter, 62.5 microns, which makes it better on concentrating the light and bend-resistance. It is suitable for 100Mb and 1Gb. Though OM1 fiber optic patch cable is still a popular indoor use multi-mode fiber optic patch cable, it has serious limitations for high speed demands.

OM2 multi-mode fiber patch cord has a core of 50 microns. It is specifically designed for use with today’s narrower aperture components. 50 µm fiber offers as much as ten times the bandwidth of 62.5 µm fiber. OM2 multi-mode fiber patch cords are used in fiber optic telecommunications and high speed transmission systems that require simultaneous, bi-directional data transfer.

OM2 Multi-mode Fiber Optic Patch Cord

OM3 multi-mode fiber patch cord also has a core of 50 microns, but the cable is optimized for laser based equipment that uses fewer modes of light. Due to this optimization, OM3 fiber patch cord is capable of running 10 Gigabit Ethernet at lengths up to 300 meters.

OM4 multi-mode fiber patch cord is a 50µm laser-optimized multi-mode fiber patch cable with extended bandwidth. It is used in networks where an overwhelming or extreme amount of data needs to be transferred. It is the preferred technology for the emerging standards that will operate at 40Gb and even 100Gb up to 150m and is commonly used in data center applications.

Applications of Multi-mode Fiber Patch Cords

Multi-mode fiber patch cables are a good choice for transmitting data and voice signals over shorter distances than single mode. They are utilized to connect high speed and legacy networks like Gigabit Ethernet, Fast Ethernet and Ethernet. They are suitable for Gigabit Ethernet in high speed LAN networks, legacy networks including Ethernet, Fast Ethernet and FDDI, data centers, premises cabling in data networks including backbone, riser and horizontal, and also video, data and voice services.

There is a great selection of multi-mode patch cords for multiple applications. These fiber patch cables can be with custom length, custom made cable jacket and different standards like LSZH, Riser and Plenum. And they can be available in simplex and duplex with FC, SC, ST, FC, MTRJ, E2000 and MU fiber optic connectors. You can select the most appropriate one for your applications.

Related Article:
Differences Between Single Mode and Multi-mode Fiber Optic Patch Cables